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“Nas is Hip Hop’s Marvin Gaye” – DL Hughley

deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited December 2011 in The Reason
Check: 2:40, He says that Nas is his favorite rapper and that he is Hip Hop's Marvin Gaye

DL Hughley speaks to ThisIs50 and comments on his favorite MC Nas.
«13

Replies

  • dalyricalbanditdalyricalbandit Co-Owner Of AllhipHop.com, Super Moderator, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 67,918 Regulator
    edited November 2011
    lol telling niggas only nigga to make nas threads from here on out is zorrow
  • Disciplined InSightDisciplined InSight The Clairvoyant One.... Posts: 13,478 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    As long as Nas don't get shot in the chest by Olu Dara it's fine..
    To be a real hood you need more than just a gun. You need ideas.

    tumblr_m9zas2KcdZ1rnneano1_1280.gif
  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    Nas is Hip Hop's Marvin Gaye, sorry Tupac
  • ibedamnedibedamned Posts: 3,098 ✭✭
    edited November 2011
    As long as Nas don't get shot in the chest by Olu Dara it's fine..

    beat me to it
  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    lol telling niggas only nigga to make nas threads from here on out is zorrow

    hahah bruh Life is Good
  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    Marvin Gaye + Mohammed Ali. Thats Nas next to mohammed ali
    RESPECT

    Marvin+Gaye.JPG
  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    uolag wrote: »
    lol @ death ...... you crazy ...... what up

    I see you brother

    Life Is Good

    nas.jpg
  • juan travoltajuan travolta Posts: 2,917 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    i seen DL hugley live once shit was hilarious one of my favorite comedians.


  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    i seen DL hugley live once shit was hilarious one of my favorite comedians.

    yeah also one of my favorite comedians
  • buttuh_bbuttuh_b Posts: 13,544 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    That is an accurate statement. Except hopefully Nas lives a long live with a lot of music!


    (CNN) -- When it comes to tough-to-watch subjects, the aftermath of more than a decade of civil war is one of them, but rapper Nas says he has started to pay attention.
    The 36-year-old artist feels a connection to the amputee victims in the recovering African country of Liberia because he, too, saw a fair share of violence growing up in New York's Queensbridge housing project. But he readily states in an "E:60" profile of the amputees that his "realities were like a walk in the park compared to what these kids go through in other countries."
    Nas will lend his distinctive voice as well as his music to the profile of the war survivors, who have come together as the Liberian National Amputee soccer team, airing Tuesday night on ESPN's "E:60." The players bear the scars of the country's 14 years of civil wars, conflicts so violent that they claimed more than 250,000 lives.
    Nas, who has been working on a collaborative record with Damian Marley that focuses on Africa, has walked away from the experience of narrating the program with a new appreciation and respect not only for the sport but, more important, for the players. The rapper says that collaborating with "E:60" producers has given him new perspective on what it means to survive.
    "It touched me so much that these guys survived a war. They were child soldiers, forced against their will, their parents killed -- these guys have survived the most inhumane situation that you can imagine," Nas said.
    The rapper, who has been embroiled in a headline-making separation from wife Kelis, told CNN that his latest career moves are those of an artist aiming to do simply what makes him happy. An edited version of the interview is below.
    CNN: How'd you get involved with the documentary?
    Nas: My man Yaron [S. Deskalo] from ESPN contacted me about it, and I was into it. It's an amazing story; it's about people's lives. I was glad to become a part of it to figure out what is wrong, what is going on and why this is happening.
    CNN: You've also said that it's impacted your perspective on your own upbringing.
    Nas: We share so much. African-Americans growing up in inner cities, especially where I grew up -- and I can't speak for anyone else -- it was out of control in many ways. I can relate in a lot of ways.
    So it's like the music that American artists talk about, specifically in the African-American community, reflect what's happening over in Africa. The struggle going on and the violence that I grew up around in New York, it doesn't parallel the violence in Liberia -- that was the worst kind of violence during the wars -- but it suited the piece. That was one of the main reasons I felt like it was important for me to be a part of it: I already felt a connection to it.
    CNN: Did you know anything about Liberia's history before teaming up with ESPN?
    Nas: Things of that matter, it's hard on the heart for anybody to see something like that. I'm guilty of turning the channel when things like that are on. Until someone brings it directly to your attention, you don't really look at it, because there are so many other hard things going on in the world, to lock in on one is hard to do. It hurts to see anybody in pain, if you've got any kind of heart.
    CNN: Was it difficult to compose the score to help explain what's happening visually?
    Nas: I've already done it, actually. CNN criticized me for a song, "Shoot 'Em Up," claiming that it was unnecessarily violent and wrong for me to make these songs, but the people who made this film, who have traveled to Liberia and have witnessed these atrocities, they found my music fitting to this.
    CNN: Did working on the documentary overlap with your work on "Distant Relatives" [the album with Damian Marley]?
    Nas: Yaron was already working on this film piece while the music I was doing already had an African theme. I think we were all thinking in the same direction.
    CNN: What was the impetus to focus the music and message of "Distant Relatives" on the continent?
    Nas: No matter where you're from -- you can be Native American, Italian, Jewish, Latino, African-American -- whatever you are, we're all distant relatives.
    That's what me and Damian are saying. First and foremost, the Jamaicans, Haitians, Bajans, Bahamians, African-Americans, we're distant relatives to our long-lost brothers and sisters in the motherland, and we're connecting with them first. And then, second, is the whole human family -- everybody in the world is family.
    CNN: What was it like to collaborate with Damian Marley?
    Nas: Damian's someone who's not caught up in what's happening today and this and that. He's someone who's concentrating on what's happening tomorrow, so with that, you get no B.S. He's a straight shooter. When he talks, it's all real.
    CNN: Where have you been drawing your inspiration from?
    Nas: I'm inspired by people like Nelson Mandela. Can you imagine -- you know how racist America was back then -- imagine how racism was in South Africa when he had to stand up and say what he had to say. That's bravery beyond comprehension. Then to survive in prison and to come home and be so resilient, he's a role model in many ways. His eyes tell a story of glory.
    CNN: How do you see your work impacting awareness of what's happening in Africa?
    Nas: We've got it all nice and comfortable here in America. America's the greatest, and I love it here, but at the same time, to see these men survive with limbs cut off and to be so talented at football ...
    They were robbed of their lives, being forced into a war as children, and this gives them new life. That makes me happy for them, because I think about them as individuals, going through what they've gone through, and to be so positive after everything that happened to their lives is inspiration to me.
    CNN: You've been through a lot in the past year, between your personal life being in the news to working on your album and pieces like this one. Do you feel like you're in a different place right now?
    Nas: I'm in a huge Marvin Gaye stage. Everything except the drugs. Everything he's saying on "Here, My Dear," I live it right now; [people] don't want you to see your son, the money sh**, giving away your pocket ... The Marvin Gaye sh**, man. That's all I can say.
    BUTTUH B - 2013 REASON DEBATES VI CHAMPION

    Lakers, Eagles, Mets, Capitals, Buckeyes (CFB), Bruins, (CBB), War Rigondeaux, War Crawford!
    #VegasLight #SwagShow #PopeyesHive
  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    buttuh_b wrote: »
    That is an accurate statement. Except hopefully Nas lives a long live with a lot of music!


    (CNN) -- When it comes to tough-to-watch subjects, the aftermath of more than a decade of civil war is one of them, but rapper Nas says he has started to pay attention.
    The 36-year-old artist feels a connection to the amputee victims in the recovering African country of Liberia because he, too, saw a fair share of violence growing up in New York's Queensbridge housing project. But he readily states in an "E:60" profile of the amputees that his "realities were like a walk in the park compared to what these kids go through in other countries."
    Nas will lend his distinctive voice as well as his music to the profile of the war survivors, who have come together as the Liberian National Amputee soccer team, airing Tuesday night on ESPN's "E:60." The players bear the scars of the country's 14 years of civil wars, conflicts so violent that they claimed more than 250,000 lives.
    Nas, who has been working on a collaborative record with Damian Marley that focuses on Africa, has walked away from the experience of narrating the program with a new appreciation and respect not only for the sport but, more important, for the players. The rapper says that collaborating with "E:60" producers has given him new perspective on what it means to survive.
    "It touched me so much that these guys survived a war. They were child soldiers, forced against their will, their parents killed -- these guys have survived the most inhumane situation that you can imagine," Nas said.
    The rapper, who has been embroiled in a headline-making separation from wife Kelis, told CNN that his latest career moves are those of an artist aiming to do simply what makes him happy. An edited version of the interview is below.
    CNN: How'd you get involved with the documentary?
    Nas: My man Yaron [S. Deskalo] from ESPN contacted me about it, and I was into it. It's an amazing story; it's about people's lives. I was glad to become a part of it to figure out what is wrong, what is going on and why this is happening.
    CNN: You've also said that it's impacted your perspective on your own upbringing.
    Nas: We share so much. African-Americans growing up in inner cities, especially where I grew up -- and I can't speak for anyone else -- it was out of control in many ways. I can relate in a lot of ways.
    So it's like the music that American artists talk about, specifically in the African-American community, reflect what's happening over in Africa. The struggle going on and the violence that I grew up around in New York, it doesn't parallel the violence in Liberia -- that was the worst kind of violence during the wars -- but it suited the piece. That was one of the main reasons I felt like it was important for me to be a part of it: I already felt a connection to it.
    CNN: Did you know anything about Liberia's history before teaming up with ESPN?
    Nas: Things of that matter, it's hard on the heart for anybody to see something like that. I'm guilty of turning the channel when things like that are on. Until someone brings it directly to your attention, you don't really look at it, because there are so many other hard things going on in the world, to lock in on one is hard to do. It hurts to see anybody in pain, if you've got any kind of heart.
    CNN: Was it difficult to compose the score to help explain what's happening visually?
    Nas: I've already done it, actually. CNN criticized me for a song, "Shoot 'Em Up," claiming that it was unnecessarily violent and wrong for me to make these songs, but the people who made this film, who have traveled to Liberia and have witnessed these atrocities, they found my music fitting to this.
    CNN: Did working on the documentary overlap with your work on "Distant Relatives" [the album with Damian Marley]?
    Nas: Yaron was already working on this film piece while the music I was doing already had an African theme. I think we were all thinking in the same direction.
    CNN: What was the impetus to focus the music and message of "Distant Relatives" on the continent?
    Nas: No matter where you're from -- you can be Native American, Italian, Jewish, Latino, African-American -- whatever you are, we're all distant relatives.
    That's what me and Damian are saying. First and foremost, the Jamaicans, Haitians, Bajans, Bahamians, African-Americans, we're distant relatives to our long-lost brothers and sisters in the motherland, and we're connecting with them first. And then, second, is the whole human family -- everybody in the world is family.
    CNN: What was it like to collaborate with Damian Marley?
    Nas: Damian's someone who's not caught up in what's happening today and this and that. He's someone who's concentrating on what's happening tomorrow, so with that, you get no B.S. He's a straight shooter. When he talks, it's all real.
    CNN: Where have you been drawing your inspiration from?
    Nas: I'm inspired by people like Nelson Mandela. Can you imagine -- you know how racist America was back then -- imagine how racism was in South Africa when he had to stand up and say what he had to say. That's bravery beyond comprehension. Then to survive in prison and to come home and be so resilient, he's a role model in many ways. His eyes tell a story of glory.
    CNN: How do you see your work impacting awareness of what's happening in Africa?
    Nas: We've got it all nice and comfortable here in America. America's the greatest, and I love it here, but at the same time, to see these men survive with limbs cut off and to be so talented at football ...
    They were robbed of their lives, being forced into a war as children, and this gives them new life. That makes me happy for them, because I think about them as individuals, going through what they've gone through, and to be so positive after everything that happened to their lives is inspiration to me.
    CNN: You've been through a lot in the past year, between your personal life being in the news to working on your album and pieces like this one. Do you feel like you're in a different place right now?
    Nas: I'm in a huge Marvin Gaye stage. Everything except the drugs. Everything he's saying on "Here, My Dear," I live it right now; [people] don't want you to see your son, the money sh**, giving away your pocket ... The Marvin Gaye sh**, man. That's all I can say.

    Good read bruh.
  • buttuh_bbuttuh_b Posts: 13,544 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    Zorrow.... LIFE IS GOOD my brotha!!

    Picture1-3.png
    BUTTUH B - 2013 REASON DEBATES VI CHAMPION

    Lakers, Eagles, Mets, Capitals, Buckeyes (CFB), Bruins, (CBB), War Rigondeaux, War Crawford!
    #VegasLight #SwagShow #PopeyesHive
  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    buttuh_b wrote: »
    Zorrow.... LIFE IS GOOD my brotha!!

    Picture1-3.png

    Damn.....I know why Nas said Hip Hop is dead
  • deathrowzorrowdeathrowzorrow Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    Nas dont even listen on Hip Hop
  • Focal PointFocal Point Kushite descent... wandering child from Meru of Old TrentonPosts: 16,307 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    that's pretty interesting, I might of said old Mos Def... but that is an interesting comparison
  • R.D.R.D. Posts: 20,156 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    this comparison is disrespectful to Mr.Gaye
  • Focal PointFocal Point Kushite descent... wandering child from Meru of Old TrentonPosts: 16,307 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    then again I don't think Nas dropping soulfulness like this
  • NothingButTheTruthNothingButTheTruth stew Posts: 10,850 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    Dead on comparison
  • Cabana_Da_DonCabana_Da_Don Posts: 7,992 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    Word is bon and that Nas & Al green mixtape is fyah!!!

    Nas tweet thats crazy I had no clue.
  • thefabmd2dcthefabmd2dc Posts: 2,572 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2011
    Marvin Gaye an actual Icon>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nas the rapper who is not an Icon
    ig:egotistboi
  • Mumo XMumo X Posts: 4,521 ✭✭
    edited December 2011
    c1up wrote: »
    then again I don't think Nas dropping soulfulness like this

    Nas is hiphop's Marvin Gaye
    uolag wrote: »
    Nice ............

    I wonder if farrakhan listen to NaS

    Most definately

    FC: Now, of course, the song that’s being talked about, the song “Louis Farrakhan.” Take us into your thinking when you laid down the lyrics to that.

    NAS: Louis Farrakhan has made me cry. You know, what do you say about that, you know what I’m saying? When you see a man who put his life on the line for something—be he right or wrong—you admire him. But to me, Farrakhan is all the way right! I’m not sitting here going line for line, detail for detail, everything he says and all of that. It’s a whole body of work that he’s laid—he’s laid his life down for his people. No matter if you like it or not. Anybody like that I admire. And, you know, anybody in this position, they would kill off. He was smart enough to say “I have an army who believe in what I’m saying, that this is the Truth.” That “I would die for everyone, every soldier in that army.” They believe that and they know that’s true. So, you know, how could I not acknowledge that’s that; that’s what I acknowledge in my life, then, it’s going to bleed into the music. It’s not even on purpose. It just happened. It’s just my thoughts. “Some revolutionaries get old, although I’m told...” you know?

    It’s like everybody’s scared to speak out about what’s in their heart, just because they’re scared of who is going to come down on them. They’re scared they’re going to get “blacklisted.” They’re going to get all their endorsements taken away from them. They’re scared that they can’t feed their families. I understand that, but I admire those people who know that, and still go and do what they have to do, you know what I mean? If I had enough money, I’d buy him a Rolls Royce tomorrow! You know what I’m saying? Like, that’s just how I feel about him!

    He is a serious piece of history, you know, coming from Elijah Muhammad; coming from Malcolm X, coming from—that part of history is so special because it’s what America is scared to talk about. They’re scared to talk about that. And, if they would talk about it, it would help a lot of people. I know a lot of White cats that listen to Farrakhan! I went to a Coldplay concert, and his introduction was Farrakhan’s speech! So, I was blown away! I’m sitting next to Gwyneth Paltrow—we’re rocking to a Farrakhan speech! So, it made me go: “Damn! If he—why didn’t I use that in my music? I’ve been wanting to!” So I’m just trying to show the love back now.

    buttuh_b wrote: »
    Zorrow.... LIFE IS GOOD my brotha!!

    Picture1-3.png

    Good drop family -- Olu Dara is the GOAT
  • Smo-King LocsSmo-King Locs Posts: 3,380 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2011
    in my opinion i think pac is the rap version of marvin gaye...Pac similar to Marvin, Music touched ya soul, very personal n emotional. Nas @ times is too lyrical n wordy to get the emotional factor across...


    but fuck it, then sounds like "your the man", and "purple" do give me the marvin vibe.
  • down2earthdown2earth Chilltown, NC via San Diego, CAPosts: 953 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2011
    Great comparison.....NAS is the GOAT when it comes to this rap shit. He crafts stories that have all the elements of the pioneers in them mixed with unparalleled lyricism.
  • CainCain The audacity of you fuck niggas Cyttorax DimensionPosts: 44,542 Regulator
    edited December 2011
    buttuh_b wrote: »
    That is an accurate statement. Except hopefully Nas lives a long live with a lot of music!


    (CNN) -- When it comes to tough-to-watch subjects, the aftermath of more than a decade of civil war is one of them, but rapper Nas says he has started to pay attention.
    The 36-year-old artist feels a connection to the amputee victims in the recovering African country of Liberia because he, too, saw a fair share of violence growing up in New York's Queensbridge housing project. But he readily states in an "E:60" profile of the amputees that his "realities were like a walk in the park compared to what these kids go through in other countries."
    Nas will lend his distinctive voice as well as his music to the profile of the war survivors, who have come together as the Liberian National Amputee soccer team, airing Tuesday night on ESPN's "E:60." The players bear the scars of the country's 14 years of civil wars, conflicts so violent that they claimed more than 250,000 lives.
    Nas, who has been working on a collaborative record with Damian Marley that focuses on Africa, has walked away from the experience of narrating the program with a new appreciation and respect not only for the sport but, more important, for the players. The rapper says that collaborating with "E:60" producers has given him new perspective on what it means to survive.
    "It touched me so much that these guys survived a war. They were child soldiers, forced against their will, their parents killed -- these guys have survived the most inhumane situation that you can imagine," Nas said.
    The rapper, who has been embroiled in a headline-making separation from wife Kelis, told CNN that his latest career moves are those of an artist aiming to do simply what makes him happy. An edited version of the interview is below.
    CNN: How'd you get involved with the documentary?
    Nas: My man Yaron [S. Deskalo] from ESPN contacted me about it, and I was into it. It's an amazing story; it's about people's lives. I was glad to become a part of it to figure out what is wrong, what is going on and why this is happening.
    CNN: You've also said that it's impacted your perspective on your own upbringing.
    Nas: We share so much. African-Americans growing up in inner cities, especially where I grew up -- and I can't speak for anyone else -- it was out of control in many ways. I can relate in a lot of ways.
    So it's like the music that American artists talk about, specifically in the African-American community, reflect what's happening over in Africa. The struggle going on and the violence that I grew up around in New York, it doesn't parallel the violence in Liberia -- that was the worst kind of violence during the wars -- but it suited the piece. That was one of the main reasons I felt like it was important for me to be a part of it: I already felt a connection to it.
    CNN: Did you know anything about Liberia's history before teaming up with ESPN?
    Nas: Things of that matter, it's hard on the heart for anybody to see something like that. I'm guilty of turning the channel when things like that are on. Until someone brings it directly to your attention, you don't really look at it, because there are so many other hard things going on in the world, to lock in on one is hard to do. It hurts to see anybody in pain, if you've got any kind of heart.
    CNN: Was it difficult to compose the score to help explain what's happening visually?
    Nas: I've already done it, actually. CNN criticized me for a song, "Shoot 'Em Up," claiming that it was unnecessarily violent and wrong for me to make these songs, but the people who made this film, who have traveled to Liberia and have witnessed these atrocities, they found my music fitting to this.
    CNN: Did working on the documentary overlap with your work on "Distant Relatives" [the album with Damian Marley]?
    Nas: Yaron was already working on this film piece while the music I was doing already had an African theme. I think we were all thinking in the same direction.
    CNN: What was the impetus to focus the music and message of "Distant Relatives" on the continent?
    Nas: No matter where you're from -- you can be Native American, Italian, Jewish, Latino, African-American -- whatever you are, we're all distant relatives.
    That's what me and Damian are saying. First and foremost, the Jamaicans, Haitians, Bajans, Bahamians, African-Americans, we're distant relatives to our long-lost brothers and sisters in the motherland, and we're connecting with them first. And then, second, is the whole human family -- everybody in the world is family.
    CNN: What was it like to collaborate with Damian Marley?
    Nas: Damian's someone who's not caught up in what's happening today and this and that. He's someone who's concentrating on what's happening tomorrow, so with that, you get no B.S. He's a straight shooter. When he talks, it's all real.
    CNN: Where have you been drawing your inspiration from?
    Nas: I'm inspired by people like Nelson Mandela. Can you imagine -- you know how racist America was back then -- imagine how racism was in South Africa when he had to stand up and say what he had to say. That's bravery beyond comprehension. Then to survive in prison and to come home and be so resilient, he's a role model in many ways. His eyes tell a story of glory.
    CNN: How do you see your work impacting awareness of what's happening in Africa?
    Nas: We've got it all nice and comfortable here in America. America's the greatest, and I love it here, but at the same time, to see these men survive with limbs cut off and to be so talented at football ...
    They were robbed of their lives, being forced into a war as children, and this gives them new life. That makes me happy for them, because I think about them as individuals, going through what they've gone through, and to be so positive after everything that happened to their lives is inspiration to me.
    CNN: You've been through a lot in the past year, between your personal life being in the news to working on your album and pieces like this one. Do you feel like you're in a different place right now?
    Nas: I'm in a huge Marvin Gaye stage. Everything except the drugs. Everything he's saying on "Here, My Dear," I live it right now; [people] don't want you to see your son, the money sh**, giving away your pocket ... The Marvin Gaye sh**, man. That's all I can say.

    I like how he was being real no fake "I watch that everyday and I know whats going on al the time type shit" Nas kept it real and stayed honest.
    I mod without feelings or remorse.


    Just been through it all man
    Blood sweat and tears
    Niggaz is dead and shit
    What the fuck else can happen yo?
    I dont think much more son, word to mother yo
    We done seen it all, and been through it all yo
    Let y'all niggaz know right now
    Word to mother, for real, for real
    I aint ever goin back
  • Mumo XMumo X Posts: 4,521 ✭✭
    edited December 2011
    down2earth wrote: »
    Great comparison.....NAS is the GOAT when it comes to this rap shit. He crafts stories that have all the elements of the pioneers in them mixed with unparalleled lyricism.

    i hav always felt like this for many years toooo......
    If Nas was Darkskinned....

    Nobody on Earth, would be talking this way!


    When did Marvin Gaye do some 'Oochie Wally' type shyt?
    When did Marvin go ruuuuuuuuun back to Berry Gordy for a record deal, after they ether'd each other on wax/Berry ejaculation-filled condoms left on Winona's carseat?
    When did Marvin marry any one similar, to....Kelis?
    When did Marvin succumb to Record Label pressure...re: What's Going On? Or "inner City: make me wanna holler"





    ...this ain't living, mufu's, naaaaaw naw naw naw, this ain't living"

    2012 -- why u tryna discredit Nas? ooops you forgot to mention:


    - Nas became the 1st rapper or african american musican to dedicate a whole album to the Motherland--a continent that birthed
    BLACK People

    - Nasir bin olu dara is an African name -- not a slave masters

    - ILLmatic is Hiphop's GOAT Album

    - The myth that Nas is a Coon is debunked cause he received a warm welcome when he went to trenchtown ; (the bith place of
    the purest form of music). He wuz smokin and kickin it with the Children of the Greatest musician to ever walk this earth
    Bob Marley and other Rastas. Its a damn shame if you think Rastas can kick it with a coon.

    - Nas raised hell on Fox News; such an action is dangerous cuz it woulda ended his Career.

    - Nas named his album " Hiphop is Dead"

    - Lastly, a song on the Untitled album named , Testify -- Nas is dissing his white fan base... Do coons do that???

    To me, i trust Rastafarians more than anyone -- they dont hang around sell outs, coons, snitches etc
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