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Wanda Lange - It's bigger than Hip Hop/Change.

traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited September 2012 in The Essence
http://istillloveher.de/2012/09/its-bigger-than-hip-hop/
This week a 16 year old boy in Chicago was shot and killed. Because of some online “rap beef” he had with someone affiliated with rapper Chief Keef.
This child was shot 17 times. And not only that, but his murderer and their whole crew and followers made cruel fun of his death. “Jo Jo was 16.He got hit 17 times so dats a bullet fa each year he was on dis earth plus da 17th 1 which was at his forehead, rest in piss”

Chief Keef himself tweeted this: “HahahahahhahahahahahahahaahhAAHAHAHAHA #RichNiggaShit Its Sad Cuz Dat Nigga Jojo Wanted To Be Jus Like Us #LMAO”
Chief Keef just signed a major deal with Interscope. This is a person who, whether you like it or not, is the face of hip hop to the public. THIS is what outsiders affiliate with our culture, with our love. I’m not in the US but I bet on TV they say that someone got killed over rap beef. And all those parents out there get scared of it.

Hip Hop saved my life. And now, it killed a child. A 16 year old, who hasn’t lived a life, who doesn’t know anything. By another child. Our children are KILLING each other because of rappers like Chief Keef. Because of a media & industry that chooses to promote Rap music that glorifies violence, ignorance, disrespect, drugs, miseducation.

This hurts me. This hurts my soul so much. Hip Hop saved my life.
And now it is being slandered and misused and manipulated and abused by money hungry people with power.

Many years ago I wrote a blog post stating that I believed the industry and government were pushing this type of rap music to make african americans look bad. To keep them down. This was when songs like “Chicken Noodle Soup” were popular. Intelligent rappers rarely make it on TV. And white people see the “Chicken Noodle Soup” image, the Waka Floka image. And they think that’s what african americans are.

My granddad (German) asked me a long time ago what my job was, I told him “Hip Hop”. He asked “Is that where they wear those pants that fall to the floor?”.

These are the images that are portrayed to outsiders.

But I could live with that.

What I can’t live with, is our children being manipulated into believing that killing another human being is normal, that drugs and disrespecting women is normal, even expected.
Hip Hop doesn’t want this. WE don’t want this. Rappers like Chief Keef are puppets. They are like actors, putting on a show. Like actors in a commercial promoting a product to the ones that are most easily influenced.

A kid won’t go online and dig for good music. Most likely they will listen to what’s served to them, on TV, radio etc. Yet music is one of the biggest influences on their lives and minds.

About a year ago I read an open letter by an anonymous source, claiming they were involved in a meeting in the 90s, of the music industry’s greatest influencers. At this meeting it was supposedly discussed how they were to push “gangsta rap” (like 50 Cent who was coming up at the time), in order to increase the incarceration rate of privately owned prisons. Because that is a huge market, with a lot of potential money to be made.
Obviously there was a lot more to this story, but it made so much sense to me, it was shocking. And then today, Rhymefest said this in response to the recent events:

“Chief Keef is a “Bomb”, he represents the senseless savagery that white people see when the news speaks of Chicago violence. A Bomb has no responsibility or blame, it does what it was created to do; DESTROY! Notice, no one is talking about the real culprits, the Bomb maker or the pilot who is deploying this deadly force (Labels, Radio Stations). Its easier to blame the bomb. Bombs are not chosen for their individual talents, they are tools used for collateral damage.
To think of the persona of Chief Keef as a person would be the first mistake, he will more then likely come and go without us knowing much of anything about his personal pains, struggles, great loves and ambitions beyond rap. He is a spokesman for the Prison Industrial Complex. Every corporation is expected to grow at least 4% each quarter, many prisons are privately owned with stock being traded on the open market.
If these corporations were to do commercials, jingles and promotions who would they hire? You got it, most of the main stream rappers we salivate over like Rick Ross the former correctional officer turned Drug Lord Boss rapper. Waka Flocka Flame gang bang “GO HARD IN THE PAINT” and Chief Keef the newest lottery pick in the “Get paid to destroy young minds, like we destroyed yours” Sweepstakes.”

And then I had to think of the story about that meeting again. This makes so much sense and is so scary. But also I think it should serve as a wake up call. To all of us who appreciate and love Hip Hop culture.
Are we going to let Hip Hop be used like this? Are we going to let our children be made into what we don’t want them to be?

I don’t want this for Hip Hop or anyone’s child. We need change. We NEED change!
And it needs to start with the kids. We can’t let our children be exposed to this music anymore. And we need to educate them about REAL music. About positivity. It is our responsibility to make a positive impact on the next generation!

Artists who make good music, that the radio is turning down, get it to these kids yourself! Don’t give up. Turn the radio off and say F*** em! Educate our children. Educate the adults if they don’t know better. Take good Hip Hop to the schools, invite kids for work shops, buy good music for your kids and make sure that’s what’s in their iPods.

The music a child, a teenager listens to is to the mind what the food is to the body. Letting them listen to this bullish** is like feeding them McDonalds every day.
Don’t let their minds starve.

I hope that this can make an impact on somebody. Even if it’s just one person.
Please share this with someone. Let this be the start to a revolution. Let us tell them that we are not gonna take this sh** anymore. Who are they to think that they can do this to us and our children, to our culture?? They don’t run this!

WE DO!




Replies

  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    http://istillloveher.de/2012/09/change/

    This is in addition to what I wrote yesterday. I received a lot of feedback, both positive and negative. Thank you very much for reading, sharing & reaching out. If you haven’t read my view on the murder of a 16yr old boy that went down in Chicago this week and rapper Chief Keef glorifying it, and what the issue with popular Rap is.. Check it out here: http://istillloveher.de/2012/09/its-bigger-than-hip-hop/



    First off, before I get to ways to better this situation, I would like to state that
    I obviously do not have all the background information about this murder. Neither am I saying that Jojo (the kid that was killed) was completely innocent.
    What happened with JoJo and Keef and everybody else who was involved is really just an example of what is going on not just in Chicago, but everywhere. And it should be a wake up call. The fact that a kid was killed and a popular rapper with a reach of millions made fun of it, THAT’s what my concern is.

    I also to not blame Hip Hop for Jojos death. When I said “Hip Hop killed a kid” I didnt mean that literally. Of course Hip Hop didnt kill him. But to society, it did.
    For someone in the public like Chief Keef to glorify this kids death is horrifying to me. Because that can cause so many more kids to be misguided than gangs ever can.

    The events this week have made me think a lot. And have made me realize that in order to change the way Hip Hop is now, we need to influence the next generation in a positive way.
    We need to give them what was given to us when we were their age.
    Balance. Choice.

    My generation and the one before mine, most the them have children now. I’m 28 and don’t have any, but I plan to in the future and I want my kids to find music as a source of inspiration, creativity and comfort, like I did myself.
    I know that most Hip Hop heads my age and older have children now and feel the same way I do, want their kids to appreciate good music, and also not to be exposed to a lot of this bullish** that’s on the media.

    The problem is that the kids between 10 – 20 only hear what is being served to them. What their parents listen to. What the radio and TV plays. And they may not be able to understand that violence and crime is wrong, because their favorite rapper tells them otherwise.
    I believe that it’s our job to give them an alternative. Because the media doesn’t. Of course we can’t ban TV and radio completely. But we can give the new generation balance. We can let them hear good hip hop. The kind we love and grew up on. And then they can decide for themselves what they want to listen to.

    I’ve been thinking long and hard about all of this. And I think I may have found a way to start taking steps in the right direction.

    I want to start a non profit organization, I haven’t figured out the name yet (I’m open to suggestions) but something like “Hip Hop for the Kids”. One idea is to come out with free mixtapes of kid friendly music. This doesn’t mean no cussing, it means Hip Hop with a positive message. I’m not saying everything has to be preachy or conscious. It can be party music too. But nothing that glorifies violence, drugs, disrespecting women and minorities or crime. A good mix of new and old Hip Hop. Of Hip Hop with a message and even without, but NO negativity. So the kids can choose for themselves what they like.

    We can give these mixtapes to the parents or the kids themselves. Parents will know that this music will not influence their children in a negative way and they will make it a point to put their kids on to it, rather than having them listen to the radio.

    Kids are so smart, when we give them choices other than what the media gives them, they will make the right one.
    Another thing that needs to be done is workshops, teaching the kids how to DJ, breakdance, graffiti, rap.. Whatever they want to learn. Keep them off the streets and also show them what Hip Hop really is. An art form. An expression of self.

    I also believe that there should be a community of bloggers who agree not to support this kind of rap music. I have never supported it on my blog personally, just because I don’t like it. But overall I think it would be great to have a community of bloggers who will take a stand against this music.
    Bloggers are so important nowadays, they can make a difference!

    I will need help from artists, DJs, Graffiti writers, B-boys & Girls, activists, bloggers, fans, parents, teachers.
    I would like to do this locally and globally, wherever people are down to help.

    Do you have any other ideas? Do you think this will help? Are YOU down to help?

  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I believe she said basically everything that I wanted to say about that Chief Keef situation. That Rhymefest line is deep as well!!

  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    Rhymefest's line was slick. He's right too, these bombs are going off all over the radio and television.

    Prime example, to me personally, is Kendrick Lamar. He came with a message that was refreshing, that was everything that this blogger wants from an emcee. He brought a track out that described 'I can only be me, that's the only way I know.'

    Unfortunately, this is the same emcee that's now on the television with a track called swimming pools about diving into a pool full of alcohol.

    He had a better message, sold out and is now making bullshit.
    Favourite Albums of 2013/Essence Threads:
    Ugly Heroes - Ugly Heroes LP
    TheEssenceSigcopy-1.gif
    traestar
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    RuffDraft wrote: »
    Rhymefest's line was slick. He's right too, these bombs are going off all over the radio and television.

    Prime example, to me personally, is Kendrick Lamar. He came with a message that was refreshing, that was everything that this blogger wants from an emcee. He brought a track out that described 'I can only be me, that's the only way I know.'

    Unfortunately, this is the same emcee that's now on the television with a track called swimming pools about diving into a pool full of alcohol.

    He had a better message, sold out and is now making bullshit.

    I haven't check up on Kendrick Lamar in a while, wow forreal?? I need to check that out!

    And see now I'm starting to think that these labels do influence the artist to change their style up for the mainstream, Too Short was right!

  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    @traestar

    Yeah, I mean it's still dope (it's Kendrick Lamar), I still love it in many ways, but he's just putting himself in line with other cats who are doing similar. That said, the West Coast style is all over the track, it's just a shame that he's conscious and has the ability to make deep and thought provoking music that's very listenable and enjoyable and when he does these sorts of tracks, he's not necessarily in a lane that he'll excel in.

    He's definitely right, why would you take advice from someone like Dr. Dre? Do you want to be a part of the late 80s or even the early 00s? Or do you want to push forward with the style that was already working brilliantly for you? That's fresh and pushing the boundaries of acceptable rap? :unno:
    Favourite Albums of 2013/Essence Threads:
    Ugly Heroes - Ugly Heroes LP
    TheEssenceSigcopy-1.gif
    traestar
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2012
    @RuffDraft

    Thats why I wonder if Interscope got in his ear about marketing himself to the mainstream. Because if he still has the same type of tracks that we are accustomed to on his album but making at least one club track, weird track or whatever, that maybe the case of getting the mainstream audience's attention. Many crossover artists did that, Eminem took off with it, Nas always has one of those club type tracks...so many do that to get the attention. Little Brother's idea was creative but not ballsy or risky because they didn't want to ruffle feathers and it hurt their marketing besides the whole BET controversy. And I'm still pissed how LB were treated on this situation, they were a return to the essence of hip hop and they wanted to appeal to their independent audience along with creating mainstream audience. Which they still did, but now they're probably declared in the mainstream as one hit wonders while they're still at home on the underground.

    Cassidy from Philly is another example and he'll tell ya that on his first album he focused on marketing for the ladies and all and alot of his hardcore fans were very upset with that. Which is why his next album he wanted to focus back on his essence and I don't believe he got the same perception.

    This is why all those A&Rs out there need to be fired, because they've allow the game to be so wack right now...but if its something that they can profit over, they'll be all over that. Thats probably why they love puppets like Chief Keef.

    RuffDraft
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    @traestar

    Yea yea, agreed. I'll still be checking for Kendrick's album and like I say, the song's nice, but I just wanted the crossover single to be more to his roots, despite him still having tracks like pussy and patron.

    We'll see how the album turns out though…
    Favourite Albums of 2013/Essence Threads:
    Ugly Heroes - Ugly Heroes LP
    TheEssenceSigcopy-1.gif
    traestar
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I thought the album came out already... but ok we'll see

  • achewon87achewon87 Mash Out Posse Survivor Series '97Posts: 5,464 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Rhymefest speaking truth. The bomb analogy is fitting.

    Although I do disagree with the prison theory, it takes generations to inflict the type of damage we are seeing now, at least 4-5 generations of "not giving a fuck" parenting to reach this point. One of the saddest things about the whole Jojo killing is how his Aunt was pretty much condoning it, saying it's like a Biggie/2Pac thing; trying to get under his opponents skin. There are so many things wrong with the situation that I cannot really summarize my feelings into a coherent post about it.

    @Ruffdraft & @Traestar Not sure what to think of the new Kendrick record; I am not feeling it all that much. 1 minute he is talking about the ills of drinking, then the whole chorus is about bitches and swimming pools full of alcohol, very confusing message to put out. 100% Interscope told him to drop this single for mass appeal, have you seen the image he is putting out in the video, strange stuff. But I never did like anything of his until Section.80, maybe it was an anomaly for me and this artist.

    traestar
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @achewon87

    If the prison theory you referring to is about the meeting, I believe she's correct about that. I believe it started way before the "meeting" around the 50's-60's where there was an increase of black male incarceration and the further promotion of gangster rap in the 90's as a way of increasing incarceration by following an image and lifestyle that has been portrayed in the media. It also justifies the treatment of black males as threats to society when not only showing negative music videos on TV but also showing shootings and gun violence in dangerous neighborhoods. I believe (even tho this is what is actually happening in our society) that they over expose this stories to continue to keep the perception of the black male threat. And the younger kids growing into this dysfunction in our community creates a cycle miseducated, misguided kids that as you said in the other thread, are hopeless and feel that their only ways out is rap or sports or dealing. This system was created and I find it funny that a german woman who is very conscious on hip hop knows and is well aware of the injustice that Black Americans are facing.


    In terms of the Kendrick Lamar video, I look at alittle bit I didn't finish. I'll check it out later.

  • achewon87achewon87 Mash Out Posse Survivor Series '97Posts: 5,464 ✭✭✭✭✭
    COINTELPRO (they used this against a variety of citizens), then they flooded the hood with Crack. These things are true and documented. The knock I have against said "meeting" is the clientele of rap music, a lot of white kids buy the music, it's always white guys & girls bumping Rick Ross and 2Chainz in the whip, at least were I'm from and it is always the suburban kids who are trying to prove themselves as street. With that said there is no doubt that hip-hop has COINTELPRO infiltration with the people in power and I believe there is a lot of subliminal messaging in mainstream music period, not just rap music. The suggested meeting can be accepted but a conspiracy of that magnitude takes a lot of keeping quiet. And history has proven that when silence is needed humans speak unless they are dead.

    I am not about to blame rap music for the ills of Southside Chicago, West Baltimore or the amount of black people locked up, it does play a large role of course. An argument can be made for it, I mean one of the bigger artist of this generation is a former C.O. It takes a lot of shit happening on purpose for things to get as bad as they are and is deeper than some hip-hop conspiracy. To me it is no longer about race it has become more of the have's vs have not's. I am talking millionaire/billionaire money, folks normal people have no chance of catching up to. I am not saying all people with money are bad but they do have interests. And I am not talking about some sort of Illuminati either that shit is bogus and an insult to anyone who knows anything. I am way off topic so I am going to stop.

    To go on about hip-hop workshops that she mentioned. Every year my city has an outdoor Graffiti show, with DJ's and breakers and writers from all over the world doing pieces. It is a very family friendly event in the day time, if you get caught smoking blunts and shit you will be kicked off the site. It is a fun time, at night the club which allows the walls to be painted has a big hip-hop show, this year was Smif-N-Wessun. One year I met Kool Herc, out of the 15 yrs or so that my crew has run this thing there has never been an incident of extreme violence, fist fights but no one pulling knifes or guns. I wondered if other places did this type of show, it should be happening all over the world.

    traestar
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Nah I don't wanna blame rap music for the violence thats going on, I just believe that the powers that be are using the negative image of the culture for their agenda. COINTELPRO is definitely involved.

    achewon87
  • achewon87achewon87 Mash Out Posse Survivor Series '97Posts: 5,464 ✭✭✭✭✭
    traestar wrote: »
    Nah I don't wanna blame rap music for the violence thats going on, I just believe that the powers that be are using the negative image of the culture for their agenda. COINTELPRO is definitely involved.

    Agreed, I did not mean you personally were pointing the finger, but outsiders. And that is due to the media over hyping everything. The hip-hop community has had a number of violent deaths take place from 2 big rappers to weed carriers, the sad thing is, nothing was learned from these tragedies. The cycle continues, the question is how do we break the cycle? How do we change the current climate in the mainstream?

    traestar
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJPosts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    achewon87 wrote: »
    achewon87 wrote: »
    traestar wrote: »
    Nah I don't wanna blame rap music for the violence thats going on, I just believe that the powers that be are using the negative image of the culture for their agenda. COINTELPRO is definitely involved.

    Agreed, I did not mean you personally were pointing the finger, but outsiders. And that is due to the media over hyping everything. The hip-hop community has had a number of violent deaths take place from 2 big rappers to weed carriers, the sad thing is, nothing was learned from these tragedies. The cycle continues, the question is how do we break the cycle? How do we change the current climate in the mainstream?

    They're trying to over hype it, criminalize it, demonize it in order for the rap music and culture to kill itself. So it wouldn't look like they pulled the plug on it unjustly.

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